Plant Care Fact Sheet

WATERING: All newly planted trees, shrubs, and perennials should be watered 2-3 times per week. More frequent watering may be required in drought conditions. The best methods for watering are trickling water from a hose end, using a watering wand, drip irrigation, watering cans, or soaker hoses. Avoid methods that wet the foliage as this can promote fungal diseases.

LAWN IRRIGATION SYSTEMS ARE NOT DESIGNED TO WATER TREES AND SHRUBS.
DO NOT RELY ON RAINFALL ALONE.


The amount of water you need to apply to each plant will vary. You are trying to keep the root zone of the plants moist. The roots on perennials may only be 6-8 inches deep, while the roots on a large tree will be 18-24 deep. Plants that were grown in containers (in potting mix) will absorb water more easily than balled and burlaped plants (grown in heavier native soils), but will also dry out faster. This means a small shrub can be easily hand watered with several gallons of water while a large tree will require a hose trickling water on it an hour or more. Quick moving thunderstorms may only wet 1-2 inches of the soil, and even long steady rains may not penetrate deep enough for larger trees. Very dry soil around your new plant acts like a sponge and pulls water away from the area. If you will be going on vacation, arrange for someone to water your new plants or hook up a timer to your hose.

Trees and shrubs need regular watering from planting time until the ground freezes. Plants installed in the Fall should still be watered until this time and usually will need supplemental watering the next season until more roots are established. Large trees are slower to establish and require watering for several seasons.

There are many misconceptions about watering during drought restrictions. You are almost always permitted to HAND WATER newly planted material during restricted hours. The news media and local municipalities often give vague or incorrect information. Restrictions are usually posted by the appropriate authorities on the internet.

INSTALLING PLANTS ON YOUR OWN: DO NOT PLANT TOO DEEP. Plants should be installed at the same level they were growing ( i.e. the soil level in the pot or the top of the root ball). This is VERY IMPORTANT so please ask if you are not sure. To install balled and burlaped plants, dig a hole the same depth and twice the width of the root ball. Carefully place the root ball in the hole and position it to your satisfaction. Stabilize the ball with soil. Only now should you cut and remove the string. Cut off or peel back and bury the burlap on the top half of the root ball. If possible, you can remove as much of the wire cage as possible. DO NOT REPOSITION THE TREE AFTER REMOVING THE STRING, BURLAP AND WIRE CAGE. Refill the hole with the original soil. You can add 20-25% organic amendments (leaf compost, peat moss, etc.) to the backfill.

FERTILIZING: We provide a (2) year slow release fertilizer when we install plants. Please do not fertilize until the third year. If you are installing plants on your own, do not fertilize the first year unless you use a slow release fertilizer (not in direct contact with the roots).

MULCHING: NEVER APPLY MULCH AGAINST THE TRUNK OR BARK OF THE PLANTS.
When mulching initially or re-applying, the depth of mulch on top of the roots should not exceed 3-4 inches.

PRUNING: Avoid pruning the first year with the exception of dead branches which should be removed as soon as possible. Each plant has an ideal window of time each year for pruning. Please ask for more information.

 

If you notice any signs of stress or need any further information on pests, diseases, or other maintenance issues, please contact us immediately. THANK YOU FOR YOUR BUSINESS.

 

KIRKPATRICK NURSERIES ▪ 1646 MIDDLETOWN RD. ▪ GLEN MILLS, PA. 19342
610-459-0339 www.kirkpatricknurseries.com